Exhibitions

Twilight of a Golden Age: Florentine Painting After the Renaissance

February 24, 2015
/ / /
Comments Closed

April 25, 2015 – January 17, 2016

On view through January 2016, Twilight of a Golden Age: Florentine Painting after the Renaissance, Masterworks from the Haukohl Family Collection provides the opportunity to see some of the finest examples of paintings and objects from the Florentine Baroque period.  Florentine Baroque paintings, dating from the late sixteenth to early eighteenth centuries, utilize vibrant colors and a brilliant use of shadow to portray dramatic scenes wrought with emotion.  The Haukohl Family Collection has been carefully curated by Sir Mark Fehrs Haukohl and this exhibition is made possible through his generosity.

Twilight of a Golden Age Press Release

Hiroshige’s 53 Stations of the Tokaido

February 4, 2015
/ / /
Comments Closed

February 6, 2016 — August 21, 2016

Hiroshige’s 53 Stations of the Tokaido  explores the most traveled road in old Japan with fresh eyes. This exhibition presents five distinct complete sets of Hiroshige’s The 53 Stations of the Tokaido Road never before displayed together. Centering on the fifty-five woodblock prints of Hiroshige’s famed first set, the Hoeido Tokaido (1832-1833, oban), the four additional series reveal the spectrum of Hiroshige’s visual poetry: Sanoki Tokaido (late 1830s, bound, chuban); Gyosho Tokaido (c. 1841-1842, aiban); Tsutaya Tokaido (c. 1850, bound, chuban); Upright Tokaido (1855, oban).  Hiroshige’s Tokaido  immerses the viewer in a panoramic view of the Tokaido and Hiroshige’s romance with the landscape of Japan. All works in this exhibition are on loan from the Ronin Collection of the Ronin Gallery, New York.

Press Release Available Here

Norman Rockwell and the Boy Scouts

January 8, 2015
/ / /
Comments Closed

February 6, 2016 – August 21, 2016

On loan from the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas, are nine paintings by Rockwell (1894-1978), famed for his nostalgic and patriotic depictions of 20th-century American life. The National Scouting Museum contains the largest collection of Rockwell’s Scout paintings anywhere in the world.

The exhibition is dedicated to William & Mary Chancellor and former U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates ’65, who became president of the Boy Scouts of America in May 2014. It also commemorates important anniversaries for both organizations: on February 8, William & Mary was chartered in 1693 and the Boy Scouts of America was founded in 1910. The National Scouting Museum and the Muscarelle Museum of Art celebrate their partnership on the university’s Charter Day weekend in association with this shared anniversary.

Press Release Available Here

Leonardo da Vinci and the Idea of Beauty

October 28, 2014
/ / /

Organized by the Muscarelle Museum of Art, this unprecedented selection of more than twenty-five masterpiece drawings by Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo from Italian museums is the first exhibition to explore Leonardo’s philosophy of beauty as contrasted with his rival Michelangelo.  Also featured will be Leonardo’s renowned Codex on the Flight of Birds, containing a hidden self-portrait at age fifty-three, which has never previously been exhibited.

February 21 – April 5, 2015 at the Muscarelle Museum of Art
and April 15 – June 14, 2015 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Press Releases:

January 20, 2015 Press Release

December 1, 2014 Press Release

Tree to Mountain: The Woodblock Prints of Toshi Yoshida

October 16, 2014
/ / /

October 17, 2014 — February 8, 2015

This exhibition celebrates the work of renowned Japanese printmaker Toshi Yoshida exploring the artist’s process, as well as his international travels. Yoshida’s woodblock prints are associated with the sosaku-hanga movement in Japanese art, which re-imagined the collaborative enterprise of printmaking by focusing on the artist as the sole creator versus traditional methods which compartmentalized skills into different rolls such as draftsman, carver, printer and publisher.

Tree to Mountain was guest curated by professors Hiroshi Kitamura and Xin Wu in conjunction with the seminar course Woodblock Exhibition Curation (ARTH 330) and installed as part of the Visual Cultures of East Asia program presented by the Muscarelle Museum of Art, the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Program, and the Reves Center for International Studies.

Celebrating the American Scene: Painters of the Federal Art Program

October 16, 2014
/ / /

February 8, 2014 — January 11, 2015

The paintings and watercolors in this exhibition were commissioned by the Federal Arts Project (1935—1943), a sector of the Works Progress Administration that promoted the creation of hundreds of thousands of works of art around the country for display in schools, libraries, and other public buildings.  This collection of works, on loan from U.S. General Services Administration, portrays the growing urbanization of American rural landscape and its people from the beginnings of the Depression into World War II.

European Paintings from the Permanent Collection and Important Loans

October 16, 2014
/ / /

February 8, 2014 — February 8, 2015

This exhibition is comprised of a selection of European landscapes, portraits and religious images, from the Baroque and Renaissance periods. The paintings come from the permanent collection and loans from Thomas D. Dossett and Associates and The Lauro Collection.  Works by Titian, Diego Velázquez, and Luca Giordano are among the important artists on view.

 

Kabuki Theater Woodcuts

October 14, 2014
/ / /

April 29, 2014 — February 8, 2015

Kabuki (its name comprised of the Kanji characters for “sing”, “dance”, and “skill”) is a form of Japanese theatre known for its elaborate costumes, striking makeup, and intricate choreography. The ancient celebration of the beautiful and the bizarre is immortalized in this exhibition of Kabuki theatre woodcuts from the permanent collection.

Jacques Callot Studies from the Permanent Collection

October 14, 2014
/ / /

April 29, 2014 — February 8, 2015

This collection of etchings, by the 17th-century French printmaker Jacques Callot, represents a significant acquisition for the Museum.  A variety of series that Callot completed over his career are on view, including a pristine impression of one of his best-known works, the etching of Saint Amond. Shown in the Herman Print Study Room, the viewer will have a chance to explore the provenance, or history of ownership, of the works on view.

21st Century Diplomacy: Ballet, Ballots and Bullets

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Guest curated by Kathryn H. Floyd, visiting instructor at the College of William & Mary, 21st Century Diplomacy featured more than four dozen images of culture, politics and war captured by photographers affiliated with the global affairs magazine Diplomatic Courier as well as William & Mary students.  Through this multi-national collaborative effort, photographers shared their experiences in witnessing narratives that help to shape political, financial, and humanitarian decisions worldwide.

Click here for the Press Release.

 

Curators At Work IV

October 13, 2014
/ / /

This is the fourth installment of our Curators at Work exhibition series.  The exhibition which runs from April 19, 2014 — May 18, 2014, will focus on new acquisitions to the permanent collection.  As in past years, this show will be curated by the Muscarelle’s own Assistant Director & Chief Curator Dr. John T. Spike and his students of his Curating, Collecting and Connoisseurship course at the College.

Caravaggio Connoisseurship: Saint Francis in Meditation and the Capitoline Fortune Teller

October 13, 2014
/ / /

February 8 to April 6, 2014, visitors coming to the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary will have a rare opportunity to view three famous paintings by, or attributed to, Caravaggio and take sides in an intense debate among the world’s leading authorities on Italian paintings. Two nearly identical versions of Caravaggio’s Saint Francis in Meditation have left experts divided. Despite years of debate, experts are in disagreement as to which one of these two beautiful paintings was created first and by whom. Which one is the original? Could they both be by the great Michelangelo Merisi, called Caravaggio? The two paintings on special loan from Rome’s Capuchin church and from the town of Carpineto Romano will be shown side by side, affording a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the Williamsburg audience to compare them. The exhibition will be completed by another of Caravaggio’s best-known compositions, the Fortune Teller, on loan from the Pinacoteca Capitoline in Rome. Although disputed by the experts until as recently as 1985, this painting is now recognized as a milestone in Caravaggio’s representation of daily life, not to mention a characteristic example of his style shortly after his arrival in Rome in the early 1590s.

Click here for the Press Release.

Glenn Close: A Life In Costume

October 13, 2014
/ / /

The Muscarelle Museum of Art will host Glenn Close: A Life in Costume, featuring selections from Close’s personal costume collection.  It consists of ensembles worn by some of the most iconic characters from Close’s career in film, theatre and television, including Norma Desmond (Sunset Boulevard), Albert Nobbs, Alex Forrest (Fatal Attraction), Cruella De Vil (101 and 102 Dalmatians) and Patty Hewes (Damages).  The exhibition will open on September 29, 2013 and run through January 12, 2014.  In conjunction with the exhibition and the 2013 William & Mary Arts & Entertainment Festival, Close and her biotech entrepreneur husband, David Shaw, will receive the William & Mary 2013 Cheek Medal Award for their contributions to the arts.

Click here for the Press Release.

In Tandem: Established and Emerging Contemporary Artists from the Permanent Collection

October 13, 2014
/ / /

More than twenty contemporary artists will be represented in the upcoming exhibition In Tandem: Established and Emerging Contemporary Artists from the Permanent Collection, September 29, 2013 — January 12, 2014. This multi- generational show includes works from the 1950s until the present by leading and emergent artists working in a variety of media and styles. Iconic works by established artists such as Chuck Close, David Hockney and Betye Saar will be showcased in tandem with up-and-coming artists Ángel Rámiro Sanchez, Steve Prince and Johnston Foster. Diverse approaches to contemporary culture, created by a cadre of multi-cultural artists, demonstrate the plurality of vision among living and modern artists in the Museum’s permanent collection.

Curators At Work III: Recent Acquisitions

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Curators at Work III: New Acquisitions, on view April 26 to May 26, 2013, will display a number of masterpieces that have been newly acquired for the permanent collection. The show will span seven consecutive centuries of art and a variety of media. These works are not featured merely for their significance to the art community at-large, rather these works were carefully selected to highlight the most significant philosophy underlying the operation and acquisitions of the Museum — the Museum’s role as a learning laboratory for the entire College of William & Mary. The director and chief curator target works for acquisition that will invigorate intellectual life at the College.  The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue of 43 memoranda written by students in Dr. Spike’s class Curating, Collecting and Connoisseurship. These memoranda demonstrate the Museum’s integral role in the intellectual life of the College by demonstrating the student’s academic and personal growth through working with these works of art first-hand.

Michelangelo: Sacred and Profane

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Organized by the Muscarelle Museum of Art, Michelangelo: Sacred and Profane Masterpiece Drawings from the Casa Buonarroti will open February 9 and be on view through April 14, 2013.  This landmark exhibition is being organized in honor of the 30th anniversary of the foundation of the Muscarelle Museum of Art in 1983. Sacred and Profane follows on the success of Michelangelo: Anatomy as Architecture, Drawings by the Master held at the Muscarelle in 2010. The purpose of the new exhibition, with its unprecedented “sacred and profane” theme, is to investigate the artist’s innermost philosophy as revealed in his original, often astonishingly beautiful, drawings.  Following the exhibition at the College, the works will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, where it opens on April 21 and closes on June 30, 2013.  The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated, catalogue produced by the Muscarelle Museum of Art with essays by Pina Ragionieri, John T. Spike, Aaron De Groft and Adriano Marinazzo.

Click here for the Press Release.

Faculty Show 12

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Works of the teaching studio art faculty including visiting instructors and emeriti professors of The College of William & Mary will be featured in an exhibition at the Muscarelle Museum of Art from October 27, 2012 through January 6, 2013. The College was the first American university to create a department of fine arts and the Muscarelle was the first accredited university museum in the Commonwealth. This exhibition, a long-standing collaboration between the two departments, will showcase representations of each artist’s current studio works. Faculty Show 12 will highlight the diverse talents of the William & Mary faculty in multiple media including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and installation.

Athenian Potters and Painters: Greek Vases from Virginia Collections

October 13, 2014
/ / /

August 18, 2012 – October 7, 2012

The vases in this exhibition, from Virginia collections, were selected to display not only a variety of subjects and shapes, but also the principal techniques used to decorate them. Arranged in an approximate chronology, starting with prehistoric pottery and ending with high classical-era red-figure pottery, Athenian Potters and Painters was organized in connection with the international conference Athenian Potters and Painters III.  The labels and wall texts were written by the students of Professor John Oakley in the Department of Classical Studies at the College of William & Mary.

William D. Barnes Three Decades of Still Life and Landscape

October 13, 2014
/ / /

The Muscarelle Museum of Art is pleased to present William D. Barnes: Three Decades of Still Life and Landscape, an exhibition of paintings and monotypes by Professor William Barnes – on view from April 14 to June 24, 2012. Barnes is retiring from the Department of Art and Art History at the College of William & Mary after thirty-seven years of dedicated teaching and mentoring students in the field of painting. The first major retrospective of this distinguished painter’s career,  the exhibition includes more than fifty paintings and fifty monotypes from a span of thirty years. In honor of the occasion, a catalogue designed by Linda Carey with introduction by Dr. Aaron De Groft has been published containing essays by Barnes and fellow painters and critics Scott Noel and John Goodrich.

Curators At Work II: Memoranda for the Curatorial Files

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Curators at Work II presents a new and enlarged version of Curators at Work: 16 Memoranda for the Curatorial Files, a small show in the spring of 2011 that received a popular response. A year ago, many visitors were delighted by the opportunity to discover that the Muscarelle owns original works of art by modern art luminaries like Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, Jim Dine, Man Ray, and Marino Marini. This year’s edition combines the fruits of the research by the students of two semesters of the Museum’s seminar, Curating, Collecting & Connoisseurship [ARTH 330-01 & ARTH 330-06]. On view in the Sheridan Gallery visitors will find treasures from the permanent collection and loans have been displayed with wall labels prepared by the students. A constellation of art world stars are out on view; Daumier, Rembrandt, Corot, Hockney, Franz Marc, and Robert Motherwell. This year the show has attracted national attention for the special addition of a rediscovered painting of St. Francis by El Greco, generously lent by Mrs. Camilla Blaffer (read more here).

Writ In Gold: Medieval Treasures In Honor of Dr. Barbara Watkinson

October 13, 2014
/ / /

A mysterious gold Merovingian ring dating from the onset of the middle ages, ca. 400 to 600, is among the medieval treasures included in , a special loan exhibition In honor of the retirement of medievalist Professor Barbara Watkinson. The ring’s diamond shaped bezel is inset with blue and green glass and set off by a cabochon garnet on all four corners (lent by the Kathleen Durdin collection). The Merovingian kings in Gaul were suppressed by Charlemagne, but their fame as a ‘realm of the rings’ survives even today in legends and literature. Guest curated by William and Mary senior Laura Conte, showcases the brilliance of almost 1500 years of western European craftsmanship. Most of the twenty pieces in the exhibition have been generously lent to the Muscarelle from the outstanding collections of the John and Mable Ringling Museum and by several private collectors. Western European liturgical objects, including an accumulation of gilt and illustrated leaves from medieval collections of antiphonals, known as ‘call and response’ chant books. Two leaves from an early Renaissance Book of Hours open a window onto the courtly life in Paris in the 1400’s. Executed by a skilled painter close to the esteemed Coetivy Master, these gilt and hand-painted vellum pages are illuminated with images of dancing devils and virtuous angels surrounded by glorious carpets of ornate filigree and foliage (lent by the Ronald R. McCarty collection). In praise of this beautiful show of rarities, Dr. Aaron De Groft, Muscarelle Director, said, “Imagine how the gold on the pages of an illuminated manuscript or the prayers in a Book of Hours shimmered and danced in the candlelight of a pre-electric age, helping worshipers to feel the presence of the divine.” The Muscarelle Museum of Art is located on Jamestown Road on the campus of The College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The Museum is open from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The Museum is closed on Mondays. Docent tours are available at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, Sundays, and other times as announced. Admission to the Museum for this exhibition is $15.00. Admission is free for Museum members, The College of William & Mary faculty, staff, and students, and children under twelve. For more information about this exhibit or the Museum in general, please call 757-221-2700 or visit www.wm.edu/muscarelle.

Eight Endangered Species

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Contemporary artist Kay Jackson portrays Eight Endangered Species using ancient techniques and creative variations on traditional frames. Since the 1990s, Kay Jackson has been quietly paying her respects to disappearing flora and fauna by making icons, one for every species. Their meticulously worked surfaces and gilt carved frames recall the sacred relics of early art. Her works evoke the irony of our readiness to lament environmental damage and our inaction to prevent.

Each of the Endangered Species panels, now more than thirty five in all, requires months to produce. Their delicately incised and gilt surfaces are layered and worked with techniques long out of common use. Jackson deliberately employs craftsmanship skills that have practically disappeared in order to pay homage to living creatures that are disappearing. The eight threatened species in the Muscarelle installation are the Figian Banded Iguana, American Buffalo, Crayfish, Grévy’s Zebra (illustrated), Salmon, Sea Horse, Red Crown Crane, and Spotted Owl. The works will be installed in a darkened gallery in order to display the reflective luminosity of the gilt surfaces.

FRAMES The Forgotten Art

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Guest curated by renowned master framer and gilder, William B. Adair, Frames: The Forgotten Art presents a globe-trotting selection of American and European hand-carved frames covering a span of more than five hundred years.

The seventeenth-century framers of the Dutch Old Masters preferred dark woods and strong geometric patterns. The grand paintings made for English country houses and Italian baroque churches required magnificent examples of the carver’s and gilder’s art.

One of the masterpieces in the exhibition is a towering baroque mirror frame with sculpted figures of gamboling putti on all four sides. This work, which once adorned the entrance hall of an Italian palazzo, has been lent to the show by the famous author and Virginia resident, Mark Helprin.

Before the plain white molding was invented, modern artists delighted in designing their own frames for their own paintings. Frames: The Forgotten Art contains three original frames designed especially for distinctive work of famous artists: the German Franz Stuck, Diego Rivera, and Thomas Hart Benton.

to learn more about Adair’s work and collection visit Gold Leaf Studios

GRAND HALLUCINATION

October 13, 2014
/ / /

Imagine Ding Dong Daddy, Messy Jesse and the Gulf of Sexico gone Day-Glo, side-by-side with fluorescent lithographs printed and embossed like gleaming jewels — the result is an unforgettable Sixties’ show… or, as Jerry Garcia might say, “What a long strange trip” this will be.

The Museum is warming up the chilly months with a wild ride of color, humor, and irrepressible creativity in the works of two artists newly added to the Muscarelle collection, William Walmsley (1923-2003) and Friedensreich Hundertwasser (1923-2000). Although they took different paths to artistic eminence in the Sixties, they were both trailblazers in their use of blazing colors.

The American Pop artist, Wamsley, was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama, in 1923. After serving in World War II, Wamsley studied in the Académie Julian in Paris where the Alabamian rubbed shoulders with the ghosts of the modern greats who had passed through, like Matisse, Picasso, and Marcel Duchamp.

As a professor at Florida State University, Wamsley soon made a name for his blatant irony, raucous humor, and shameless punning. He also became known as a sage of advanced printmaking and the inventor of florescent lithography. Wamsley holds the record of the longest continued series of prints in the history of art in his alter-ego titled, “Ding Dong Daddy,” creating the character in the 1960s and exploring himself until his death in 2003. Bill Wamsley said to make any art at all, is a “self-portrait.”

This new donation to the Muscarelle includes works that span the career of a genius of parody and amazing technique, with his lithographs including sometimes over ten colors. Each color is a separate pull off of the litho stone and very difficult to get right. Also shown in this exhibition is a rare set of the separation drawings done in preparation for each separate color.

Sharing center-stage are also new acquisitions of virtiouso prints by Friedensreich Hundertwasser (1923-2000), an artist once as famous as Picasso. Born half a world away from Walmsley, but at almost the same time, Hundertwasser was the most important Viennese contemporary artist of his time. His work is playful, absolutely colorful and shimmering, and based on the works of fellow Austrian Egon Shiele, Surrealism, and Hundertwasser’s concept of “transautomitism.” As the founder of the movement, he embraced the visualization of his fantasies to immerse the viewer in the experience of the painting, rather than focusing on the interpretation of reality. He also loved spirals and was very much like Gustav Klimt in his use of symbols, gold and metallic inks as he parlayed his ideas on philosophy, environmentalism, design and architecture into an unmistakable visual language. He also hated straight lines.

These two artists together are sure to blow your mind – to use a favorite expression from the period.