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The Adjacent Possible

July 9, 2019
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Muscarelle Museum of Art (Sheridan & Spigel Galleries) | August 27 – September 27, 2019

This exhibition, curated by Elizabeth Mead, Professor of Art and W. Taylor Reveley Interdisciplinary Faculty Fellow, seeks to analyze how humans cogitate and process our experience when viewing works of art.  The title of the exhibition is a term borrowed from the scientist Stuart Kauffman who defines “the adjacent possible” as the limits of creative potential and how those boundaries grow and enlarge the more one explores them.  The Adjacent Possible  ponders an area of science called neuro-aesthetics and offers first-hand experiential interaction with contemporary abstract works from a distinguished group of living artists comprised of Michelle Benoit, Phil Chang, Stefan Chinov, Jaynie Crimmins, Sara Dochow, Diane Englander, Pamela Farrell, Karen Fitzgerald, Helen O’Leary, Lorraine Tady, Jo Volley, and Susan York.

Docent-led public tours are available on Saturday & Sunday between 1:00 – 3:00 PM.  Docent-led private tours are available by request; contact museum@wm.edu for more details.

//youtu.be/S8YMOKJNLlY

VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE: The Making of Objects of Ceremony 

June 5, 2019
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VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE is proud to present The Making of Objects of Ceremony.

William & Mary students curated this exhibition as part of a required practicum course for Art History majors called The Curatorial Project (ARTH 331). The exhibition explored ceremony as a vital cultural impulse expressed by communities and individuals around the world through an incredible diversity of artistic forms and objects.
Objects of Ceremony  was curated by the following students in The Curatorial Project, a course taught by Alan C. Braddock, Ralph H. Wark Associate Professor of Art History and American Studies, in alphabetical order: Greer Bateman, Grace Bland, Vanessa Cai, Ronghong Dai, Emma Efkeman, Melissa Hudson, Lizzie Johnson, Kathleen Lauer, Davidson Norris, Matt Parciak, Clara Poteet, Sarah Roberts, Sam Ros, Emma Shainwald, Caitlin Wagner, Alijah Webb, and Kathryn Willoughby.

VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE: BUILDING ON THE LEGACY

February 11, 2019
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VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE is proud to present Building on the Legacy: African American Art from the Permanent Collection comprised of paintings, drawings, and sculptures by renowned artists.

Created to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first African American students in residence at William & MaryBuilding on the Legacy: African American Art from the Permanent Collection was part of a yearlong program of special events during the 2017-2018 academic year, which spoke to themes of parity and desegregation. The original exhibition, held at the Muscarelle Museum of Art (September 2, 2017 – January 14, 2018), featured works that encompassed a variety of media, styles, and eras, exemplifying the plurality of vision among these accomplished artists. Re-created and expanded for VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE as part of AMERICAN EVOLUTION™, the 2019 commemoration in the Commonwealth, Building on the Legacy embraces a panoply of approaches, ranging from the 19th-century realism of Henry Ossawa Tanner to the contemporary conceptualism of Martin Puryear.

Announcing the Inaugural Exhibition for VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE

September 6, 2018
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The Muscarelle Museum of Art is proud to present the virtual exhibition “Women with Vision: Masterworks from the Permanent Collection” in recognition of the 100 Years of Women celebration at William & Mary. This panoramic virtual tour allows the user to view works from the Muscarelle collection alongside curatorial research expressly chosen to honor the contribution women have made in the arts. Women with Vision online launches the Museum’s digital initiatives project called VIRTUAL MUSCARELLE. For optimal viewing, we suggest using Google Chrome, Safari, or Opera web browsers.

Press Release Available Here

Miriam Schapiro | American, 1923 – 2015 | In the Land of Oo-Bla-Dee, 1993 | Color lithograph | © Miriam Schapiro | Museum Purchase | 2000.022